We’ve all heard the saying, “build it and they will come”, but with a website that isn’t the case. You can have the best eCommerce site in the world. But without a well-planned marketing strategy, no one will ever see it.

Not to worry I’ll guide you through five key marketing tactics to get you noticed.

SEO

Anyone who owns a website would have heard the term thrown around “SEO”, but what is it? Short for Search Engine Optimisation, SEO is the art of making a website rank better on Google (or Bing, Yahoo etc.). It’s not as simple as it sounds, everything can have an impact, and it’s not always a good one.

Not to worry, the general idea is to write good quality content. So think about:

Product Descriptions

You’re going to want your products to rank for their names, as well as their purpose. Think about it, if I’m selling Digital Marketing services, I’ll want to focus my writing on that topic.

Don’t leave any product descriptions blank, and aim for around 300 words. It can be tough but remember your customers want to know about the product, and so does Google.

Make a blog

It’s not a coincidence that almost every site has a blog. Serving as an excellent way to write more content a blog helps search engines pick your site up. I mean you’re on my blog, and I’ve mentioned marketing around 4 times. It’s all getting picked up and helping my SEO.

Be sure that whatever you write, is clear, understandable and not filled with your keyword. If a search engine thinks that you’re “spammy” you might get penalised.

Don’t worry, like I said there are plenty of tools here are a few of the ones I like.

  • Hemmingway – For readability testing. (So far this article is easy to read for anyone in year 4 at school).
  • Grammarly – For spelling and grammar checking
  • SEOTools – For SEO writing best practices

We write quite often about SEO, so if you’re after some more information why not read some of our other posts? If you need some extra help, we also offer an SEO service.

Social Media

Social media can be a significant asset to eCommerce businesses. Post about interesting facts, information and news relating to your target audience.

An example would be if I sold camping gear, I’d post about picturesque camping sites. As well as some helpful tips, or stories about camping, and of course the occasional product.

When working on social media it’s key that you don’t always try to sell. Remember it’s about engaging with your customers, think about what they like and talk about it.

No one will listen to someone who’s always product pushing.

Email Marketing

There’s a lot of different email marketing methods, but for eCommerce, we can break it down into three.

Newsletter

I’m sure you’re all familiar with a newsletter email. It’s the perfect way to let your subscribers know about new products, blog posts and to remind them you exist.

Use promotions and social media to grow your subscription list, then re-market to them. With MailChimp, you can even personalise them with recommended products.

Cart Abandonment

Don’t let your customers forget about their carts. If they took the time to add the items it’s likely they wanted to buy them. Use cart abandonment emails to bring customers back.

Did you know that roughly 15% of online shoppers will abandon their carts on purpose in the hopes of a discount?

Follow-up

Customer service is vital, so a little after sale follow-up is a nice touch. Ask what they think of their product, offer a discount for next time, and recommend other products.

You want the customer to shop with you again. Use the information you already know about them to keep them coming back.

Reviews

You might be thinking that reviews aren’t a marketing method, but in reality, they are. Your customers might be sceptical of a product, and a positive review can change that.

They help with SEO, and you can use the great ones on social media or in your email newsletter. Building trust is the perfect marketing strategy.

Discounts

Offering a discount is an excellent way to entice people to do something. Whether it’s signing up to a newsletter or interacting with social media. It’s also great at convincing people to buy from you.

Be cautious of offering too many discount codes, it can be a double-edged sword. For example, if you always give away 10%, you’re almost admitting that you are overcharging by at least that.

My recommendation is to vary discounts and avoid a permanent offer. So, run promotions for a week, month but never keep it running.